Life After Brain Injury.

         Where survivors
                   re-invent themselves.


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John’s Story

 

Not too long ago, John was one of about thirty people Life After Brain Injury works with on a semi-weekly to monthly basis.

Six years ago, John was brutally beaten with a metal pipe in his business’s parking lot. In an instant, his life changed. His brain injury sent him on a downward spiral that is experienced by nearly all survivors who must somehow find a way to literally start life anew.



Following brain surgery, a coma and months in the hospital, John was eager to return to work. He had always been an entrepreneur; at the time of his assault, he was running two self-started companies.

          But with his diminished cognitive abilities and impaired judgment, he could no longer manage his

          businesses. He sold them both at a loss and had to give up working. Soon after, his Simi Valley home went

          into foreclosure. His wife left him and moved out of state, taking their then-four year old daughter with her.

          ("Fun" fact: Some 80 to 90% of marriages end when a spouse sustains a brain injury.)

   

          When we met him in 2010, John had been homeless for four years. He slept under a street overpass

          near the railroad tracks. With no family to provide support, he had failed to adapt to life with his disability.

          We met him at the Samaritan Center, a drop-in homeless nonprofit in Simi Valley. We worked with him for

          almost four years, two to six hours every week, helping him deal with his life problems and reviewing his

          progress on a variety of ongoing issues. We…


          … taught him to budget his monthly Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) check ― perhaps his

               toughest challenge. He would run out of money halfway through each month.

          ...  helped him look for a room to rent. Unfortunately, landlords close the door every time he would disclose

               his brain injury and seizures. (Brain injury carries with it a terrible stigma.)

monitored his medications, especially one prescription drug to which he had become addicted.     
… connected John with the Department of Rehabilitation, since he was interested in becoming gainfully
     employed again.
 
…  helped him prepare in advance for appointments with doctors and his Department of Rehab
      vocational counselor, so he could get all his questions answered by the professionals and understand his
      next steps.

      ..…. accompanied him (at his request) to all types of appointments and:

              •   took notes, so he would have a written record of what was discussed and decided;

              •   educated professionals about John’s impaired thinking, memory and judgment; 

              •   provided problem-solving and advocacy support when others didn’t understand his disability; and 

              •   helped him to stay calm and focused when he got frustrated with the maze of healthcare, employment

                   and benefits systems.


          John moved to Tennessee six months ago to live close to his daughter, now seven. He tells us that with the

           help of a local shelter, he found housing. He sees his little girl weekly and is very happy.


          Like most survivors with cognitive and judgment impairments, John will need an organization like Life After

          Brain Injury to provide a continuum of supports, for the rest of his life. We understand this. We assist several

          people who are homeless or at-risk of becoming homeless. Your donation will help them get their lives back

          on track and keep them there.

 




Following brain surgery, a coma and months in the hospital, John was eager to return to work. He had always been an entrepreneur; at the time of his assault, he was running two self-started companies. But with his diminished cognitive abilities and impaired judgment, he could no longer manage his businesses. He sold them both at a loss and had to give up working. Soon after, his Simi Valley home went into foreclosure. His wife left him and moved out of state, taking their then-4-year-old daughter with her. (Ninety percent of marriages end when a spouse sustains a brain injury.)

 

John has been homeless for four years. He sleeps under a street overpass near the railroad tracks. With no family to provide support, he has failed to adapt to life with his disability. We met John in late 2010 at the Samaritan Center, a drop-in homeless nonprofit. Since then, we’ve worked with him two to six hours a week dealing with his life problems and reviewing progress on a variety of issues. We…

 

Ø …are teaching him to budget his monthly Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) check

   perhaps his toughest challenge. He runs out of money halfway through each month.

     

Ø  …have helped him look for a room to rent. Unfortunately, landlords close the door every time he

         discloses that he has a brain injury and seizures. Brain injury carries with it a terrible stigma.)

 

Ø  monitor his medications, especially one prescription drug to which he has become addicted.

 

Ø …have connected John with the Department of Rehabilitation, since he is interested in becoming

         gainfully employed again.

Ø  …help him prepare in advance for appointments with doctors and his Department of Rehab

         vocational counselor, so he can get all his questions answered and understand his next steps.

 

Ø accompany him (at his request) to all types of appointments to:

 

        take notes, so he will have a written record of what was discussed and decided;

 

        educate professionals about John’s impaired thinking, memory and judgment; 

 

        provide problem-solving and advocacy support when others don’t understand his disability; and

 

        help him to stay calm and focused when he gets frustrated with the bureaucratic system.

 

Text Box: www.LifeAfterBrainInjury.org s LifeAfterBI@gmail.com s (805) 490-8211 s   P.O. Box 1556   Thousand Oaks CA 91358Like most survivors with cognitive and judgment impairments, John will need Life After Brain Injury (or someone like us) to provide a continuum of supports, for the rest of his life. Your donation will help John, and others like him, get their lives back on track and keep them there.

Following brain surgery, a coma and months in the hospital, John was eager to return to work. He had always been an entrepreneur; at the time of his assault, he was running two self-started companies. But with his diminished cognitive abilities and impaired judgment, he could no longer manage his businesses. He sold them both at a loss and had to give up working. Soon after, his Simi Valley home went into foreclosure. His wife left him and moved out of state, taking their then-4-year-old daughter with her. (Ninety percent of marriages end when a spouse sustains a brain injury.)

 

John has been homeless for four years. He sleeps under a street overpass near the railroad tracks. With no family to provide support, he has failed to adapt to life with his disability. We met John in late 2010 at the Samaritan Center, a drop-in homeless nonprofit. Since then, we’ve worked with him two to six hours a week dealing with his life problems and reviewing progress on a variety of issues. We…

 

Ø …are teaching him to budget his monthly Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) check

   perhaps his toughest challenge. He runs out of money halfway through each month.

     

Ø  …have helped him look for a room to rent. Unfortunately, landlords close the door every time he

         discloses that he has a brain injury and seizures. Brain injury carries with it a terrible stigma.)

 

Ø  monitor his medications, especially one prescription drug to which he has become addicted.

 

Ø …have connected John with the Department of Rehabilitation, since he is interested in becoming

         gainfully employed again.

Ø  …help him prepare in advance for appointments with doctors and his Department of Rehab

         vocational counselor, so he can get all his questions answered and understand his next steps.

 

Ø accompany him (at his request) to all types of appointments to:

 

        take notes, so he will have a written record of what was discussed and decided;

 

        educate professionals about John’s impaired thinking, memory and judgment; 

 

        provide problem-solving and advocacy support when others don’t understand his disability; and

 

        help him to stay calm and focused when he gets frustrated with the bureaucratic system.

 

Text Box: www.LifeAfterBrainInjury.org s LifeAfterBI@gmail.com s (805) 490-8211 s   P.O. Box 1556   Thousand Oaks CA 91358Like most survivors with cognitive and judgment impairments, John will need Life After Brain Injury (or someone like us) to provide a continuum of supports, for the rest of his life. Your donation will help John, and others like him, get their lives back on track and keep them there.



 

Ø …are teaching him to budget his monthly Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) check

   perhaps his toughest challenge. He runs out of money halfway through each month.

     

Ø  …have helped him look for a room to rent. Unfortunately, landlords close the door every time he

         discloses that he has a brain injury and seizures. Brain injury carries with it a terrible stigma.)

 

Ø  monitor his medications, especially one prescription drug to which he has become addicted.

 

Ø …have connected John with the Department of Rehabilitation, since he is interested in becoming

         gainfully employed again.

Ø  …help him prepare in advance for appointments with doctors and his Department of Rehab

         vocational counselor, so he can get all his questions answered and understand his next steps.

 

Ø accompany him (at his request) to all types of appointments to:

 

        take notes, so he will have a written record of what was discussed and decided;

 

        educate professionals about John’s impaired thinking, memory and judgment; 

 

        provide problem-solving and advocacy support when others don’t understand his disability; and

 

                      help him to stay calm and focused when he gets frustrated with the bureaucratic system.